When a scent has a question mark beside it, it indicates that some authority has placed it in that category, but my experience, as well as other sources, contradict it. (Especially when the same scent appears as all three notes!) However, it is not unusual for a specific scent to fill two adjacent functions, depending on the other oils in the blend.

Top NotesMiddle NotesBase Notes
AniseAniseBalsam Peru
BasilBasilBay?
Bay?BayBenzoin
BergamotCardamomCalendula ?
Black PepperCassiaCassia
Cardamom?ChamomileCedarwood
ChamomileClary SageCinnamon
Clary SageCloveCistus/Rockrose/Labdanum
CorianderFennelClove
EucalyptusGeraniumCypress
GeraniumGingerFrankincense
Juniper BerryJasmineGinger
Lavender?Juniper BerryJasmine
LemonLemongrassMyrrh
LemongrassLavenderNeroli
LimeMarjoramOakmoss
Marigold/TagetesNeroli/Orange BlossomPatchouli
Neroli?NutmegPeppermint?
PeppermintPalma RosaRose
PetitgrainPeppermintRosewood
SpearmintPineSandalwood
TangerineRoseTonkaBean
Tea TreeRosemaryVanilla
VerbenaRosewoodVetiver
SpikenardYlangylang
Tea Tree
Thyme
Ylangylang

Among other sources, the above information was gathered from works of Valerie Worwood, Christine Malcolm, Anne Berwick, Susan Renick, and other sources that have contributed to my education, but are too hopelessly intertwined to isolate. My thanks to all of them.

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